ESG Reporting

Contact community contributions

  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20
Community contribution spend $796,601 $714,054 $430,000 $850,000
Number of organisations / initiatives supported 72  111 123 N/A
Volunteering hours spent 557  474 733 N/A

 

Contact Contributions and other spending

  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20
Charitable donations $76,872 $199,688 $36,642
$442,000
Lobbying, interest representation or similar $163,000 $161,000 $167,986 $169,540
Political donations $0 $0 $0 $0

 

Membership of associations or advocacy organisations

Holds a position on the governance body
Electricity Retailers’ Association of New Zealand (ERANZ)
Gas Industry Company

 

Participates in projects or committees

Participates in projects or committees
Australasian Investor Relations Association (AIRA)
Business New Zealand
Champions for Change
Climate Leaders Coalition
Drive Electric
Electricity Authority Market Development Advisory Group
Electricity Network Aotearoa (ENA)
ERANZ
GasNZ
Hugo Group
International Geothermal Association
Liquefied Petroleum Gas Association
NZ Geothermal Association
NZ Hydrogen Association
NZ Initiative
Sustainable Business Council
Wellington Chamber of Commerce
Women in Geothermal

Key metrics

  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20
Net Promoter Score (NPS) +41 +39 +31  +36
Energy sold (Electricity) GWh 5.1k 4.9k 5.1k 5.6k
Energy sold (Gas) GWh 713 780 780 838
Electricity & gas customers 57k 57k 52k 52k
Broadband customers 85k 70k 50k 24k

 

Services to customers

FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20
Electricity
Gas
Broadband

 

Energy wellbeing

  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20
New customers signed up following a credit-check, incl failed checks 96% 98% N/A N/A
Customers reconnected within 24 hours following a credit disconnection 58% 49% 53% 45%

Greenhouse & Energy

  • Operational greenhouse gas footprint (material sites and fuels)

Group Scope 1 emissions

  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18
Fuel used for thermal generation (tCO2e) 339,828 604,929 866,013 722,834 777,467 960,926
Fuel used for geothermal generation (tCO2e) 186,454 181,615 178,524 199,965 207,436 213,772
Total fuel used for generation (tCO2e) 526,282 786,544 1,044,537 922,799 984,903 1,174,698
Fuel used in vehicles (tCO2e) 307 297 178 270 880 1,072
Fugitive emissions - SF6 (tCO2e) 32 1
29 4 122 2
Total Scope 1 526,621 786,842 1,044,744 923,073 985,905 1,175,772
Thermal generation emission intensity (tCO2e per MWh) 0.657 0.537 0.518 0.502 0.517 0.505
Geothermal generation emission intensity (tCO2e per MWh)
0.059 0.055 0.057 0.06 0.06 0.06
Total generation emission intensity (tCO2e per MWh) 0.069 0.094 0.123 0.108 0.110 0.135

Generation intensities consist of thermal/geothermal/total generation emissions (tCO2e) divided by the thermal/geothermal/total generation volume (MWh), including Te Rapa direct sales.
Some prior year intensity figures have been updated compared to what has been included in past integrated reports (which excluded Te Rapa direct sales). However, we think this now consistently and better reflects the emission intensity levels. Te Rapa was closed in June 2023 so will not be included in intensity calculations going forward.

 

Group Scope 2 and 3 emissions

  • All categories are measured in tCO2e
Scope Category FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18
Indirect Emissions (Scope 2) Electricity consumption 1,950 1,394 1,300 1,258 1,374 1,397
  Simply Energy - electricity consumption 4 3 3 N/A N/A N/A
  Western Energy - electricity consumption 3 2 N/A N/A N/A N/A
  Subtotal 1,957 1,399 1,303 1,258 1,374 1,397
Indirect Emissions (Scope 3) Purchased goods and services 6,197 6,371 16,699 11,915 35,267 47,507
  Capital goods 88,266 57,876
41,726 18,052 6,536 13,899
  Fuel and energy-related activities 1,050 149,743 330,207 91,857 175,811 77,049
  Upstream distribution and transportation 108 444
27 14 628 116
  Waste 47 108
149 123 148 134
  Business travel  1,274 567
263 719 1,256 1,182
  Employee commuting 965 832
306 606 2 2
  Use of sold products  175,603 178,554
165,259 166,310 301,640 370,168
  Downstream leased assets 164 289
399 306 445 586
  Franchises N/A N/A N/A N/A 2,069 4,536
  Subtotal 273,673 394,784
555,036 277,987 523,802 515,179
Total (Scope 1, 2 and 3)   802,252 1,183,025 1,601,083 1,202,317 1,511,081 1,692,348

Note: The completion of a swaption deal with Genesis in late 2022 resulted in the large reduction of scope 3 emissions in the ‘Fuel and energy-related activities’ category for FY23. For more info on our emissions, see our Greenhouse Gas Inventory.

 

Geothermal assets at 30 June 2023

Geothermal assets at 30 June 2023 Book value ($m) Generation (GWh) Emissions (tCO2e) Emissions intensity (gCO2e/KWh) Compliance with CBI standards (<100 gCO2e/KWh)
Poihipi 137 308 12,090 39 Yes
Tauhara
917 - - N/A
Yes
Te Mihi
466 1,380
50,643
37
Yes
Te Huka
98 176
8,684
49
Yes
Wairākei 743 998 19,456
19
Yes
Te Huka expansion
107 - -
N/A
Yes
Tenon & Nature's Flame¹ 8 195
1,577 8 Yes
Ohaaki²
108
323
94,004
291 No
Geothermal portfolio total/average 2,584
 3,380
186,454
55  
Eligible Green Asset total/average
2,476
3,057
92,449
30  
Total Eligible Green Debt Instruments
1,474
       
Green Asset Ratio³
1.68
       

¹Includes direct heat sold to Tenon and Nature's Flame
²Ineligible asset in relation to Contact's Green Borrowing Programme
³Calculated as Total Eligible Green Assets / Total Eligible Green Debt Instruments
Note: For more information on our Green Borrowing Programme, see https://contact.co.nz/aboutus/sustainability/financial-sustainability

 

Other emissions (metric tonnes)

Emissions FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19
NOx 89.73 123.36 107.5 131
SOx 27.48 38.53 35.57 40.56
Dust
29.06 41.96 37.98 43.32
Direct Mercury
0.20 0.08 0.17 0.30

Note: All figures are best estimates based on available information. NOx is calculated on TCC data only, SOx and Dust is all thermal stations except Te Rapa. Direct Mercury is based on 80% of Geothermal gas stacks in FY21 and FY22, otherwise 100%

 

Energy consumption by primary fuel source 

Total energy consumption FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18
Non-renewable fuels (nuclear fuels, coal, oil, natural gas, etc.) purchased and consumed (MWh)* 1,733,583 3,032,381 4,228,588 3,699,602 3,887,061 4,767,215
Renewable fuels consumed for generation (MWh)** TBC 33,590,511 32,459,295 34,212,240 33,378,084 33,766,679
Renewable Generation 93% 87% 81% 83% 83% 79%

*Re-calculated using conversion factor of 1 GJ = 0.277778 MWh
**Calculated using converstion factor of 1 MM Btu = 0.29307 MWh

 

Revenue from non-renewable fuels

  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20
Revenue from thermal coal (NZD) $0 $0 $0 $0
Revenue from diesel (NZD) $1.2m $2.4m $7.5m $1m

 

Waste

Total solid waste disposed (i.e. not recycled, reused or incinerated waste for energy recovery)

  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18
Total waste generated (metric tonnes) 104 91.7 132 108.6 126.1 109
Total waste used/recycled/sold (metric tonnes) 6.5 0.7 6 3.6 3.4 0

 

Hazardous waste

  FY22
Hazardous waste landfilled (tonnes) -
Hazardous waste incinerated with energy recovery (tonnes) >20
Hazardous waste incinerated without energy recovery (tonnes) -
Hazardous waste otherwise disposed (batteries collected) (tonnes) >1
Hazardous waste with unknown disposal method (tonnes) 5
Total hazardous waste disposed >26
Total hazardous waste recycled/reused -

Hydro power density

Measure Clyde Roxburgh
Lake area (m2) 25,000,000 5,900,000
Nameplate capacity (W) 432,000,000 320,000,000
Power density (W/m2)* 17.3 54.2

* Hydropower Sustainability Standard requires a power density greater than 5W/m2.

 

  • Water reported in Megalitres (ML)

Non-consumptive water usage

Source/water use FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20
Clutha Mata-Au River water* 17,370,983 15,730,988 15,098,980 16,624,902
Geothermal reservoir 75,209 75,339 69,180 75,992
Geothermal cooling water* 316,530 332,270 336,840 330,047
Total 17,762,722 16,138,597 15,505,000 17,030,941

 

Total water withdrawal

Source/water use FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20
Geothermal reservoir 106,128 105,577 103,177 114,805
River and surface water* 1,641 2,076 2,509 1,536
Water from third parties* 245 294 321 283
Council* 21 23 40 34
Total 108,036 107,970 106,047 116,658

 

Total water discharge

Source/water use FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20
Geothermal reservoir 15,319 15,228
15,831
23,818
Discharge to rivers 15,974 15,533 18,727
15,476
Total 31,293 30,761
34,558
39,294

* Freshwater

Water volumes for our operations are recorded onsite via meters that measure flow. The flow inlet and outlet determines categorisation of water use, for instance, geothermal fluid outlets to rivers are categorised as 'Discharge to rivers'. Geothermal reservoir discharge is comprised of evaporation / land discharge.

Site rehabilitation and restoration

Description of habitat restoration and location Major species conserved or protected at site Size of area restored in hectares Partnership Organisations Area status as at 30 June 2023 Frequency of monitoring and reporting of biodiversity
Torepatutahi Wetland restoration project (offset site) Restoration of wetland species including 3 at risk taxa including swamp nettle, fernbird and spotless crate  37.8 Operated as part of our consent requirement. In partnership with Ngati Tahu-Whaoa Runanga, Department of Conservation (DOC), Fish & Game and landowners   Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance, and annual planting programme We undertake biannual monitoring of ecological transects to track restoration progress*
Te Rau o Te Huia Steam restoration project Enhancing the riparian for a variety of native flora and fauna species including geothermal kanuka 21 Ngati Te Rangiita Ki Oruanui and Wairākei Charitable Trust Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance and annual planting programme We undertake annual monitoring of the project area to track restoration progress 
Waipuwerawera restoration project Restoring 5 distinct areas of stream, including geothermal, riparian and wetland environments. Protecting at-risk geothermal kanuka. Approx. 6 Tuwharetoa Maori Trust Board, Taupō District Council, Pamu Farms and DOC Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance and annual planting programme We undertake annual monitoring of the project area to track restoration progress
Te Kiri o Hine Kai geothermal area pest plant and animal control Protecting at-risk geothermal kanuka and geothermal ladder fern, forked fern and giant hypolepis vegetation Approx. 69 Waikato Regional Council, Land Information NZ and Ministry for Primary Industries Ongoing maintenance of pest plants and animals We undertake biannual monitoring of the project area to track reinvasion of pest plants and animals*
Oruanui geothermal area retirement Retired geothermal vegetation site from pastoral agriculture to protecting at-risk geothermal kanuka and geothermal ladder fern, forked fern and giant hypolepis vegetation 3.3   Ongoing pest plant maintenance Informally when monitoring the maintenance required
Otumuheke Stream restoration project Protecting at-risk geothermal kanuka and geothermal ladder fern, forked fern and giant hypolepis vegetation 14 Waikato Regional Council, Taupō District Council and Patuiwi Trust Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance and annual planting programme We plan to undertake annual monitoring of the project area to track progress
Wairākei geothermal system- Retirement of land from pastoral agriculture to enhance biodiversity Enhancing early succession native flora and fauna 35 Greening Taupō (selected sites across Wairākei Drive) Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance and annual planting programme Annual monitoring for internal reporting
Ohaaki geothermal system- enhancement of riparian environment Enhancing early succession native flora and fauna 3 Ngati Tahu Landowner collective Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance and annual planting programme We plan to undertake annual monitoring of the project area to track progress
Tauhara geothermal system- Retirement of land from pastoral agriculture to enhance biodiversity Enhancing early succession native flora and fauna 12   Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance and annual planting programme Annual monitoring for internal reporting
Riparian Management- ex keegan (Stratford) Restoration of riparian margin to enhance native flora and fauna 2 Taranaki Regional Council Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance and annual planting programme Monitored by Taranaki Regional Council as part of the riparian management plan
Riparian management- Stratford water intake  Restoration of riparian margin to enhance native flora and fauna 0.5 Taranaki Regional Council Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance and annual planting programme Monitored by Taranaki Regional Council as part of the riparian management plan
Gladstone Gap, Hāwea Enhancing early succession native flora and fauna 0.5 Hāwea Community Association (HCA). Wānaka Backyard trapping Systematic removal of pest plants, pest animals, maintenance and annual planting programme Monitored by HCA, reviewed within HFLMP annually and formal review every 4 years, progression and work plans monitored through Biodiversity Management Plan
As part of Native Fish programme, restoration continued at multiple locations in lower Clutha Mata-au in 2022/23 Enhancement of habitat for multiple at-risk native fish species such as inanga, tuna, kanakana and giant kōkopu. Sites include Rutherglen, Bobs Creek, Riverview Farms, Creighton Park, Fraserdowns, Matau Branch Matai Channel & Pond, Kouau Branch Channel, and Landsdown, Pamu Farms. 7.07 DOC Annual riparian planting, maintenance, fencing of waterways and weed control Annually as part of our resource consent requirements. DOC carry out monitoring and annually provide reports. Progression and work plans monitored through Biodiversity Management Plan

* Independent assurance has been undertaken for the Torepatutahi Wetland restoration work, and Te Kiri o Hine Ka protection work. Other restoration and protection work has not been assured.

 

Description of habitat restoration and location Major species conserved or protected at site Activities  Partnerships Area status as at 30 June 2023 Monitoring and reporting frequency

Roxburgh Dam – Trap and transfer programme to facilitate the migration of native fish species

Adult tuna, juvenile elver and kanakana 180kg of elver were released in multiple locations above the Roxburgh dam.

197 adult tuna caught in the upper lakes of the Clutha Mata-au and released below the Roxburgh dam.
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), DOC Annual trap and transfer programme. Annually as part of our resource consent requirements. Progression and work plans monitored through Biodiversity Management Plan

We work with a variety of stakeholders to help identify habitats to protect and restore and we engage an Ecologist to undertake an assessment to develop a restoration plan for the particular area, including the types of management techniques necessary to address risks to biodiversity at each habitat.

 

Threatened species list

  • IUCN Red list
Level of Extinction Risk Number of species

Critically endangered

2
Endangered 4
Vulnerable 2
Near threatened 1
Least concern 8
Not threatened >4

 

  • New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS)
Level of Extinction Risk   Number of species

Threatened

Nationally critical 2
  Nationally endangered 4
  Nationally vulnerable 4
  Nationally increasing 1
At risk Declining 7
  Recovering -

  Relict -
  Naturally uncommon 2
Not threatened   >1

 

Mitigating actions 

Human activity is causing a decline of biodiversity in Aotearoa New Zealand, through climate change, introduced invasive species, land / sea use change, direct exploitation, and pollution. Contact takes a range of mitigating actions to reduce our impacts on biodiversity. Our efforts are informed by a mitigation hierarchy (Avoid, Minimise, Restore, Offset, Compensate). For example:

  • We regenerate and restore local biodiversity in our areas of operation. Expert environmental effects assessments are undertaken for all new sites that inform the development of operational Biodiversity Management Plans to avoid, reduce, mitigate or restore any impacted biodiversity at all sites. The plans set out physical work priorities for steps like exclusion fencing, native tree planting, pest plant & animal control and establishing riparian margins. Contact and DOC have been working with landowners and volunteers at multiple sites in the lower Clutha Mata-au catchment over a number of years to enhance freshwater fish habitat. As well as benefiting native fish, the fencing and riparian planting provide a buffer to waterways from stock damage, run-off, bank erosion and sedimentation.
  • We engage independent ecologists and consult with tangata whenua to advise on and deliver ecological restoration plans for critical biodiversity and unique ecosystems. This includes native tuna (eel) and kanakana (lamprey) on the Clutha Mata-Au and geothermal vegetation across the three geothermal fields we operate on. The plans identify critical biodiversity issues and provide a blueprint for prioritising and restoring the areas, normally over several years.
  • We seek as a priority to avoid impacts on biodiversity where practicable, a consideration through the Resource Management Act process. For example, reconfiguration and refinement of the Southland Wind Farm footprint has been an iterative process undertaken by Contact in collaboration with expert ecologists to minimise the effects on habitat loss associated with vegetation removal. This exercise has been undertaken to avoid, where practicable, impacts on high and very high value habitats and associated species, including the use of pre-existing roads to the greatest extent possible. 
  • Where we cannot fully avoid impacts on biodiversity, we reduce our impact on local flora and fauna, for example through our native fish trap and transfer programmes around our hydro power stations, and the monitoring and mitigation for losses of the rare geothermal vegetation around our geothermal operations. We will also continue to plant more than 20,000 indigenous plants annually to help retore and enhance biodiversity.
  • We transform areas of exotic forest (once harvested) with indigenous species on land we own. We recently harvested 7 hectares of exotic forest and replanted the area in a mixture of indigenous species, planting over 15,000 plants. We also return and/or transform pasture into indigenous forest on our land where it is not sustainable for pastoral agriculture, to enhance biodiversity corridors throughout our areas of operation. For example, the Stratford Riparian Management Plan directed by the Taranaki Regional Council identifies areas that are not suitable for pastoral use and return these areas into indigenous vegetation.

Electricity output by primary energy source

 GWh  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18 FY17 FY16 FY15 FY14
Thermal generation 517 1,046  1,592  1,360  1,421  1,812   1,742  1,614  2,321  2,865
Hydro generation 3,919 3,940  3,698  3,752  4,231  3,479  3,562  4,091  4,119  4,058
Geothermal generation 3,185 3,283  3,114  3,333  3,256  3,323  3,233  3,297   3,074  2,322
Total  7,622  8,269  8,404  8,445  8,908  8,614  8,537  9,002  9,514  9,245

 

Geothermal generation

Please refer to the Sustainable Finance webpage

 

Installed capacity of operated generation assets

  • Installed capacity of operated generation assets
  • Pool generation volume
  • Equivalent availability factor

Hydro

  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18 FY17
Net capacity (MW) 784 784 784 784 784 784 784
Availability (%) 84% 83% 84% 92% 97% 95% 92%
Capacity factor (%) 57% 57% 54% 54% 62% 51% 52%
Electricity output (GWh) 3,918 3,939 3,698 3,752 4,231 3,479 3,562
Pool revenue ($/MWh) 74 121 167 90 123 78 47
Pool revenue ($m) 290 478 617 338 521 271 169

 

Geothermal

  FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18 FY17
Net capacity (MW) 410 425 425 425 425 425 429
Availability (%) 94% 97% 89% 95% 92% 96% 91%
Capacity factor (%) 89% 91% 84% 89% 87% 89% 86%
Electricity output (GWh) 3,186 3,284 3,114 3,333 3,256 3,323 3,233
Pool revenue ($/MWh) 80 140 175 99 133 80 55
Pool revenue ($m) 254 458 546 330 434 267 177

 

Taranaki combined cycle (TCC)

FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18 FY17
Net capacity (MW) 377 377 377 377 377 377 377
Availability (%) 85% 84% 89% 88% 63% 68% 90%
Capacity factor (%) 5% 20% 34% 26% 31% 32% 31%
Electricity output (GWh) 161 672 1,126 870 1,031 1,071 1,021
Pool revenue ($/MWh) 107 180 193 120 115 102 64
Pool revenue ($m) 18 121 217 104 117 110 65

 

Stratford Peakers

FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18 FY17
Net capacity (MW) 202
202 202 202 202 202 202
Availability (%) 77% 53% 90% 80% 64% 79% 92%
Capacity factor (%) 8% 10% 13% 16% 12% 30% 30%
Electricity output (GWh) 145 176 232 289 206 526 495
Pool revenue ($/MWh) 207 212 230 161 185 114 70
Pool revenue ($m) 31 38 54 47 38 60 35

 

Whirinaki

FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18 FY17
Net capacity (MW) 158
158 158 158 158 158 158
Availability (%) 82% 95% 94% 98% 98% 99% 99%
Capacity factor (%) 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
Electricity output (GWh) 1 3 17 2 5 3 1
Pool revenue ($/MWh) 491 597 410 293 472 656 2108
Pool revenue ($m) 1.2 2.4 7.5 1 2.5 1.7 1

 

Te Rapa (spot generation only)

FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18 FY17
Net capacity (MW) 41
41 41 41 41 41 41
Availability (%) 92%
95% 93% 98% 96% 87% 98%
Capacity factor (%) 30%
54% 58% 51% 54% 59% 63%
Electricity output (GWh) 107
195 208 184 195 211 226
Pool revenue ($/MWh) 94
145 174 106 160 94 58
Pool revenue ($m) 12
28 37 21 31 20 13

Note: Te Rapa has ceased operation from June 2023

Training & Development

  FY23 FY22
Average hours per FTE TBC 15.13
Average amount spent per FTE ($NZD) TBC 587

Note: Reported numbers are from the best available data, however training & development budgets are currently decentralised at Contact. We aim to centralise training budgets by FY24.

 

Executive Ownership

FY23 FY22
CEO TBC 0.0015
Average across other executive members TBC 0.13

Note: Above represents shares fully owned by the executive team (incl vested shares) as a % of base salary - calculated as: value of shares * number of shares / base. Shares awarded to CEO begin vesting in FY23

 

Hiring

FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19
Total number of new employee hires 220 363 172 198 186
Percentage of open positions filled by internal candidates (internal hires) 47% 41% 45% 49% 56%

Total number of new employee hire rates and the percentage of open positions filled by internal candidates.

 

Turnover

FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19
Total employee turnover rate 18.3% 19.2% 17.4% 16.9% 19%
Voluntary employee turnover rate 13.7% 13.4% 11.8% 12.5% 12.1%
 

Employment contract and type by gender and region

All counts are based on headcount unless stated otherwise as at 30 June

FY23 Women Men Other Undisclosed North Island South Island Undisclosed Total
Permanent employees 516 582 0 14 885 218 9 1112
Fixed-term employees 11 13 0 0 20 2 2 24
Casual 1 3 0 0 4 0 0 4
Total 528 598 0 14 909 220 11 1140
Full-time employees 435 571 0 12 825 183 10 1018
Part-time employees 92 24 0 2 80 37 1 118
Non-guaranteed 1 3 0 0 4 0 0 4
Total 528 598 0 14 909 220 11 1140

 

FY22 Women Men Other Undisclosed North Island South Island Undisclosed Total
Permanent employees 470 538 0 15 813 206 4 1023
Fixed-term employees 30 23 0 0 46 7 0 53
Casual 2 4 0 0 5 1 0 6
Total 502 565 0 15 864 214 4 1082
Full-time employees 401 528 0 15 777 163 4 944
Part-time employees 99 33 0 0 82 50 0 132
Non-guaranteed 2 4 0 0 5 1 0 6
Total 502 565 0 15 864 214 4 1082

 

FY21 Women Men Undisclosed Total
Permanent employees 405 497 1 903
Fixed-term employees 21 21 0 42
Total 426 518 1 945
Full-time employees 339 494 1 834
Part-time employees 87 24 0 111
Total 426 518 1 945

 

FY20 Women Men Undisclosed Total
Permanent employees 417 476 0 893
Fixed-term employees 22 19 0 41
Total 439 495 0 934
Full-time employees 352 469 0 821
Part-time employees 87 26 0 113
Total 439 495 0 934

 

Board gender diversity

Board of Directors Women Men Under 30 30-50 Over 50 European/ Pākehā Māori Pasifika Total
Board of directors FY23 4 3 0 4 3 6 1 1 7
Board of directors FY22 4 3 0 4 3 6 1 1 7
Board of directors FY21 4 3 0 4 3 6 1 1 7
Board of directors FY20 3 4 0 3 4 6 1 1 7

Note: Individuals may choose multiple ethnicities

 

Employee diversity at 30 June, by business unit

Simply Energy and Western Energy do not currently track ethnicity

FY23 Women Men Other Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
Officers 2 8 0 0 0 4 6 0 10
Corporate 74 52 0 2 15 77 35 1 128
Retail 310 115 0 7 129 197 102 4 432
Development 10 24 0 0 2 16 16 0 34
Generation and trading 69 291 0 2 39 163 157 3 362
ICT 33 63 0 2 13 54 31 0 98
Digital 30 45 0 1 13 51 12 0 76
Total 528 598 0 14 211 562 359 8 1140
Simply Energy 31 34 0 0 8 47 7 3 65
Western Energy 5 32 0 0 7 27 3 0 37
Total 564 664 0 14 226 636 369 11 1242

 

FY23 European/Pākehā Māori Pasifika Asian Other AMELA Undisclosed North Island South Island Undisclosed
Officers 4 0 0 0 4 1 1 10 0 0
Corporate 49 11 4 16 39 1 27 119 9 0
Retail 186 70 20 38 97 4 97 288 141 3
Development 17 0 0 2 9 1 7 33 0 1
Generation and trading 160 21 4 27 106 7 74 297 64 1
ICT 37 7 1 19 18 2 25 90 3 5
Digital 24 1 0 28 14 3 15 72 3 1
Total 477 110 29 130 287 19 246 909 220 11
Simply Energy 51 12 2
Western Energy 35 0 2
Total 477 110 29 130 287 19 246 995 232 15

 

FY22 Women Men Other Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
Officers 2 8 0 0 0 5 5 0 10
Corporate 54 32 0 0 13 55 17 1 86
Retail 329 127 0 9 153 206 102 4 465
Development 12 22 0 0 3 18 13 0 34
Generation and trading 65 285 0 1 36 154 158 3 351
ICT 28 63 0 3 13 55 26 0 94
Digital 12 28 0 2 6 30 6 0 42
Total 502 565 0 15 224 523 327 8 1082
Simply Energy 30 33 0 1 6 42 9 7 64
Western Energy 6 27 0 0 7 23 3 0 33
Total 538 625 0 16 237 588 339 15 1179

 

FY22 European/Pākehā Māori Pasifika Asian Other AMELA Undisclosed North Island South Island Undisclosed
Officers 4 0 0 0 4 1 1 10 0 0
Corporate 34 6 3 8 24 0 24 83 3 0
Retail 189 69 21 42 107 3 120 321 143 1
Development 18 0 0 2 7 1 6 34 0 0
Generation and trading 143 22 3 25 120 5 71 288 63 0
ICT 33 8 1 19 18 1 26 88 3 3
Digital 17 1 0 11 9 3 8 40 2 0
Total 438 106 28 107 289 14 256 864 214 4
Simply Energy 53 10 1
Western Energy 32 0 1
Total 438 106 28 107 289 14 256 949 224 6

 

FY21 Women Men Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
Officers 3 6 0 0 3 6 0 9
Corporate 47 26 0 9 48 15 1 73
Customer 309 197 1 138 248 117 4 507
Development 8 18 0 2 10 14 0 26
Generation and trading 51 257 0 31 122 152 3 308
Total 418 504 1 180 431 304 8 923
Simply Energy 24 25 0 4 32 7 6 49
Western Energy 7 22 0 8 20 1 0 29
Total 449 551 1 192 483 312 14 1001

 

FY21 European/ Pākehā Māori Pasifika Asian Other AMELA Undisclosed
Officers 4 0 0 0 3 1 1
Corporate 26 5 0 7 19 0 23
Customer 196 57 15 53 124 6 140
Development 12 0 0 1 7 1 5
Generation and trading 121 18 2 17 108 4 71
Total 359 80 17 78 261 12 240
Simply Energy
Western Energy
Total 359 80 17 78 261 12 240

 

FY20 Women Men Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
Officers 2 4 0 0 2 4 0 6
Corporate 42 27 0 8 43 16 2 69
Customer 324 192 0 147 244 121 4 516
Generation 71 272 0 28 152 160 3 343
Total 439 495 0 183 441 301 9 934

 

FY20 European/ Pākehā Māori Pasifika Asian Other AMELA Undisclosed
Officers 3 0 1 0 2 0 1
Corporate 24 5 0 5 23 0 20
Customer 183 47 13 45 129 8 168
Generation 135 20 2 18 119 3 86
Total 345 72 16 68 273 11 275

 

Employee diversity at 30 June, by employee category

FY23 Women Men Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
KMP 2 8 0 0 4 6 0 10
Other Execs/GMs 8 6 0 1 8 5 0 14
Senior Management 9 26 0 0 19 16 0 35
Other Managers 44 92 2 6 73 58 1 138
Non-Managers 465 466 12 204 458 274 7 943
Total 528 598 14 211 562 359 8 1140
STEM 128 391 5 62 265 194 3 524
Sales 310 115 7 129 197 102 4 432

FY23 European/Pākehā Māori Pasifika Asian Other AMELA Undisclosed
KMP 4 0 0 0 4 1 1
Other Execs/GMs 6 1 0 1 4 0 3
Senior Management 19 1 0 0 13 0 6
Other Managers 68 12 1 11 34 0 32
Non-Managers 380 96 28 118 232 18 204
Total 477 110 29 130 287 19 246
STEM 212 24 5 73 139 13 114
Sales 186 70 20 38 97 4 97

 

FY22 Women Men Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
KMP 2 8 0 0 5 5 0 10
Other Execs/GMs 2 4 0 0 5 1 0 6
Senior Management 11 23 0 0 21 13 0 34
Other Managers 48 84 0 4 69 58 1 132
Non-Managers 439 446 15 220 423 250 7 900
Total 502 565 15 224 523 327 8 1082
STEM 112 380 6 56 251 188 3 498
Sales* 329 127 9 153 206 102 4 465

* 69% of people in management roles were women

 

FY22 European/Pākehā Māori Pasifika Asian Other AMELA Undisclosed
KMP 4 0 0 0 4 1 1
Other Execs/GMs 1 0 0 0 2 0 3
Senior Management 16 2 0 1 15 0 6
Other Managers 60 8 1 8 35 2 30
Non-Managers 357 96 27 98 233 11 216
Total 438 106 28 107 289 14 256
STEM 202 28 4 56 145 10 107
Sales 189 69 21 42 107 3 120

 

FY21 Women Men Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
KMP 3 5 0 0 3 5 0 8
Other Execs/GMs 3 5 0 0 7 1 0 8
Senior Management 13 18 0 0 21 10 0 31
Other Managers 34 73 0 2 49 55 1 107
Non-Managers 365 403 1 178 351 233 7 769
Total 418 504 1 180 431 304 8 915

 

FY21 European/Pākehā Māori Pasifika Asian Other AMELA Undisclosed
KMP 3 0 0 0 3 1 1
Other Execs/GMs 1 0 0 0 3 0 4
Senior Management 16 1 0 1 14 0 5
Other Managers 49 7 1 6 33 0 23
Non-Managers 290 72 16 71 208 11 207
Total 359 80 17 78 261 12 240

 

Employee diversity at 30 June, by employee category as percentage

FY23 Women Men Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
KMP 20% 80% 0% 0% 40% 60% 0% 10
Other Execs/GMs 57% 43% 0% 7% 57% 36% 0% 14
Senior Management 26% 74% 0% 0% 54% 46% 0% 35
Other Managers 32% 67% 1% 4% 53% 42% 1% 138
Non-Managers 49% 49% 1% 22% 49% 29% 1% 943
Total 46% 52% 1% 19% 49% 31% 1% 1140
STEM 24% 75% 1% 12% 51% 37% 1% 524
Sales 72% 27% 2% 30% 46% 24% 1% 432

 

FY22 Women Men Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
KMP 20% 80% 0% 0% 50% 50% 0% 10
Other Execs/GMs 33% 67% 0% 0% 83% 17% 0% 6
Senior Management 32% 68% 0% 0% 62% 38% 0% 34
Other Managers 36% 64% 0% 3% 52% 44% 1% 132
Non-Managers 49% 50% 2% 24% 47% 28% 1% 900
Total 46% 52% 1% 21% 48% 30% 1% 1082
STEM 22% 76% 1% 11% 50% 38% 1% 498
Sales* 71% 27% 2% 33% 44% 22% 1% 465

* 69% of people in management roles were women

 

FY21 Women Men Undisclosed Under 30 30-50 Over 50 Undisclosed Total
KMP 38% 63% 0% 0% 38% 63% 0% 8
Other Execs/GMs 38% 63% 0% 0% 88% 13% 0% 8
Senior Management 42% 58% 0% 0% 68% 32% 0% 31
Other Managers 32% 68% 0% 2% 46% 51% 1% 107
Non-Managers 47% 52% 0% 23% 46% 30% 1% 769
Total 46% 55% 0% 20% 47% 33% 1% 915

 

Board of Directors Women Men Under 30 30-50 Over 50 European/ Pākehā Māori Pasifika Total
Board of directors FY23 57% 43% 0% 57% 43% 86% 14% 14% 7
Board of directors FY22 57% 43% 0% 57% 43% 86% 14% 14% 7
Board of directors FY21 57% 43%

0%

57% 43% 86% 14% 14% 7
Board of directors FY20 43% 57% 0% 43% 57% 86% 14% 14% 7

Supplier screening

We do not monitor non-Tier-1 suppliers.

  FY23
FY22 FY21
Tier-1 Suppliers 1382
1597 1470
Significant suppliers in Tier-1 79*
79* 79*
% of total spend on significant suppliers in Tier-1 80%
80% 80%
Significant suppliers not in Tier-1 0 0 0
Total number of significant suppliers 79 79 79

* Method of identifying 'Significant Suppliers' at time of submission was suppliers accounting for 80% of spend for each business unit using FY20 - FY22 spend + suppliers identified as high risk due to geographical location by PWC.

Initially 92 suppliers were identified but 13 were not included as they were no longer used.

Safety data at 30 June

Work-related injuries*

FY23 Number (Employees) Rate** (Employees) Number (Non-employees) Rate** (Non-employees)
Fatalities 0 0 0 0
High-consequence work-related 0 0 1 0.6
Recordable work-related injuries 2 0.89 19 11.33
Number of hours worked 2,243,146 N/A 1,677,314 N/A

The main types of work-related injuries: Strains, sprains and lacerations

Work-related hazards that pose a risk of high-consequence injury: Energy sources, harzardous substances, working at height, working in confined spaces, lifting heavy loads, working with mobile plant, working around water, excavations, fitness for work, staying safe while driving, scope of work change.

 

FY22 Number (Employees) Rate** (Employees) Number (Non-employees) Rate** (Non-employees)
Fatalities 0 0 0 0
High-consequence work-related 0 0 0 0
Recordable work-related injuries 0 0 5 5.49
Number of hours worked 2,028,778 N/A 911,130 N/A

The main types of work-related injuries: Open wound not involving traumatic amputation (i.e. cut finger)

Work-related hazards that pose a risk of high-consequence injury: Energy sources, hazardous substances, working at height, working in confined spaces, lifting heavy loads, working with mobile plant, working around water, excavations, fitness for work, staying safe while driving, scope of work change.

 

FY21 Number (Employees) Rate** (Employees) Number (Non-employees) Rate** (Non-employees)
Fatalities 0 0 0 0
High-consequence work-related 0 0 0 0
Recordable work-related injuries 1 1 4 9
Number of hours worked 1,914,213 N/A 465,707 N/A

The main types of work-related injuries: Foreign body in eye, Strains and sprains.

Work-related hazards that pose a risk of high-consequence injury: Energy sources, hazardous substances, working at height, working in confined spaces, lifting heavy loads, working with mobile plant, working around water, excavations, fitness for work, staying safe while driving, scope of work change.

* Monitored contractors excluded from above

** Rate is calculated on worked hours normalised to 1,000,000 hours.

 

Work-related ill-health*

FY23 Number (Employees) Number (Non-employees)
Fatalities 0 0
Recordable work-related ill health 0 0

Work-related hazards that pose a risk of ill health: Energy sources, harzardous substances, working at height, working in confined spaces, lifting heavy loads, working with mobile plant, working around water, excavations, fitness for work, staying safe while driving, scope of work change.

* Monitored contractors excluded from above

Hazards were identified through observation cards, hazard ID, risk assessment, manager walk arounds, toolbox talks etc and captured in our H&S management system. Regular reviews by internal and external stakeholders including WorkSafe NZ, and our ongoing sharing seminars allow us to minimise the above listed risks, and other risks, through engagement and knowledge sharing. Other activities we've undertaken recently include:
- Revalidating safety cases at sites
- Upgrading electrical protection systems
- Introduction of the GetHomeSafe App
- Requiring all people at risk of exposure to harmful gases such as H2S to wear gas detectors

Data is compiled through our H&S reporting system, including injuries and ill health. A report is generated with includes classifications and injury summary. The categorisation of these help us to determine if it is a work-related injury or illness, and the agency of the injury.

 

Other safety data

FY23 FY22 FY21 FY20 FY19 FY18
Controlled TRIFR 5.4 1.7 2.1 2.1 1.3 3.3
Monitored TRIFR 14.9 10.9 21.5 5.4 18.8 6.6
Process safety (Tier 1) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Process safety (Tier 2) 0 0 3 2 2 0
Process safety (Tier 3) 28 40 49 24 58 56

Tier 1 - a significant loss of containment of hazardous material or energy
Tier 2 - a lesser loss of primary containment or a significant degradation of barriers
Tier 3 - learning event where issues have been identified in our process safety barriers or controls

 

Reportable privacy incidents

FY23 FY22 FY21
Number of complaints received from outside parties & substantiated 30 0 1
Number of complaints received from regulatory bodies 0 0 0
Total number of identified leaks, thefts, or losses of customer data 59 76 28

We started recording the number of privacy breaches from 1 December 2020. Most of the privacy breaches were considered minor in nature (for example, affected one or two customers causing little or no harm). In FY23, we introduced better recording for the source of complaints (i.e from customers (outside parties) vs staff).

 

Reportable business ethics breaches

FY23
Corruption or Bribery 0
Discrimination or Harassment 1
Conflicts of Interest 0
Money Laundering or Insider Trading 0
Behaviours 6
Find out more about our Sustainable Finance Framework and Reporting here